Does Your Liver Need a Tune-Up?

 
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Dr. Tatyana's Health and Wellness Blog

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Does Your Liver Need a Tune-Up?
Written By: Dr. Tatyana ~ 5/16/2022

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In Traditional Chinese Medicine, each season is ruled by a particular organ system and spring is connected to the liver. What does this mean? Well, you probably notice changes in the way you feel, both physically and mentally, as the seasons change. I know I tend to feel a bit more contemplative and introspective during the winter months. Once spring hits, I’m ready to recharge and get things done. The liver energy is strong and assertive, the type of energy you need to create plans and then propel them into motion. However, if your liver is a little out of balance, you might notice you are more irritable or on edge than usual. Here are a few signs that your liver is in need of an acupuncture tune-up:

1) You’ve noticed an increase in headaches lately, and these headaches seem to feel worse when you aren’t active. Generally, these headaches tend to manifest at the vertex of your head.

2) You might begin to feel constipated or bloated. Your bowel movements might become irregular, alternating between constipation and loose stools. Hard, difficult stools that appear pebbly are also a sign of liver imbalance.

3) Your friends or coworkers are scared of you because you are cranky, cranky, cranky. When liver energy is out of balance, you might feel agitated, irritated and generally out of sorts. Sometimes the irritation can expand into outright anger more easily than it would if this energy was flowing smoothly.

BLOGPOST_LiverDetox05162022B.jpg4) Ladies, you may notice your PMS symptoms have been worse lately. Bloating, breast tenderness, sensitivity...you can blame all the above on your liver. If your periods are more painful or clotted, this is also due to a stagnation of liver energy.

5) Your eyes are red, itchy or irritated.

6) Your shoulders, neck or jaw are uncomfortably tight. If the liver energy is out of balance, it can flow upward. This causes everything in your body to rise up: you might grind or clench your teeth, your shoulders will levitate up around your ears, and you might experience symptoms of TMJ.

7) Your allergies are in full force. Common symptoms among allergic rhinitis include runny nose, sneezing, watery eyes, swelling around the eyes, persistent cough, sinus headaches, earaches and more.

If you are suffering from any of these issues, your body is crying out for a visit, COME AND TALK TO ME!


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Tips for Insomnia
Written By: Dr. Tatyana ~ 5/2/2022

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When you consider that Traditional Chinese Medicine (or TCM) dates back over 3,000 years, it is easy to see the vastness of theory and history involved. This fascinating complementary medicine arms practitioners with a plethora of unique diagnostic tools. These tools include an ability to detect Qi imbalances, define the underlying problems and correct them. When it comes to Spring, Traditional Chinese Medicine recommends MORE activity. In order for one to become more physically active, it is imperative to have and maintain a healthy sleep schedule. However, recent statistics show nearly 60 million Americans experience insomnia and other sleep-related problems daily (and this statistic was taken before the Covid-19 global crisis). With these numbers, understand that if you are suffering from insomnia or unable to get a good night’s rest, you are absolutely not alone. The good news is, implementing some basic TCM practices could help you get back on track.

Acupuncture and TCM continue to come out on top of the list of suggested treatments for sleepless nights and improper circadian rhythms. The reason TCM is so effective has a lot to do with the adaptability of treatment modalities. TCM does not only suggest herbs and acupuncture, or massage and physical exercise but also lifestyle changes to introduce healthy habits. Here are some of our favorite lifestyle adaptations you can consider if you or someone you love is struggling with insomnia.

Spend time outside: Camping has been shown to help reset the sleep cycle of insomniacs. Your body will be able to reset itself after a couple of days, allowing your circadian rhythm to get you back into a proper sleeping pattern. This theory goes hand in hand with some of TCM’s primary principles, staying in tune with nature. Ask me for some of my favorite springtime outdoor activities.

Digital detox: The digital stimulation we experience these days is overwhelming. This past year was absolutely no exception. In 2020, virtual meetings and classes took over our homes, near-constant attention to news updates became a necessary evil, and social media became the primary means of community. With the “go-go-go” attitude of mainstream culture, sometimes digital stimulation alone can make it hard to slow down enough to find rest. Turn off the devices at least 2 hours before bed. Better yet, create a digital detox day of the week: one day where you and your family unplug and allow yourself to re-acclimate to the natural world.

Plan for sleep: Setting a bedtime, and sticking with it, can help reset your sleep cycle. Implement a routine and do the same things nightly before going to bed. If you are struggling to fall asleep on time, consider a wind-down routine. Create a routine for yourself that may include a cup of tea, a yoga or tai chi session, reading or writing. Experiment with what feels best for your mind and body.

Change the lighting: We are all sensitive to light. Before the regular use of artificial lighting, humans spent their evenings in a slow transition to nighttime darkness. In the evening create a darker environment in your home to help your brain ease out of the daytime stimulation and start slowing down. Alternatively, when you wake up in the morning, be sure to open the shades and turn the lights on again to help tell the brain to wake up and get going. Consistency is essential and will help train your brain and balance your circadian rhythm.

Late-night binges: Stop ingesting caffeine, alcohol, and nicotine and go easy on the late-night snacks. Eating too late is common and can cause indigestion and restless nights. If you’re still hungry right before bed, try something light and healthy, like a tablespoon of peanut butter or a handful of almonds.

Schedule your evaluation: Traditional Chinese Medicine has been proven by many studies to be a safe and effective treatment for insomnia. Treatments include acupuncture, at home acupressure routines, breathing exercises, lifestyle changes, environmental adaptations, herbal prescriptions, even nutritional recommendations and so much more. Your specific symptoms and patterns of disharmony will be addressed all in an effort to find the root cause(s) of your sleeplessness.

As you can see, there are many ways to battle insomnia and balance your sleeping patterns. Find the remedies, therapies, and routines you resonate with most, and stick with them. I’m here to help, give me a call to schedule your appointment for more information.


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Stay Healthy in Spring and Overcome Adrenal Fatigue
Written By: Dr. Tatyana ~ 4/18/2022

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Most people look forward to spring. It means new life, longer hours of daylight and depending on where one lives, warmer weather.

This transition allows for the ability to get more done and spend more time outdoors, possibly shedding those extra pounds gained over the holidays and reconnecting with nature. But as with any seasonal change, there are organ systems that need specific attention. This is where Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) excels in helping make a smooth transition.

As we transition from winter to spring, it’s important to understand that in TCM, the season of winter is associated with the element of water, and it corresponds to the kidneys. The kidneys house our life force or jing (adrenal gland) and therefore, they must be constantly fed and replenished, as jing dissipates over time (adrenal fatigue). Winter is the perfect time to do this and is done by sleeping more, eating hearty, warming seasonal foods, and avoiding excessive sweating or exercising.

The season of spring is associated with the element of wood, and it corresponds to the liver. As everything around, us blossoms in the spring, so too should we embrace this time. But the liver tends to be a bit of a bully for many people, and it must be kept in check. Often the winter months leave some stagnant feelings, which can manifest in different areas like relationships, work, or even our bodies. If there is frustration, physical pain, or sadness, it may be a sign that energy is not flowing properly or optimally.

Eating according to the seasons is very important in TCM. As the weather gets warmer, most people gravitate towards healthier food options to lose some of the winter weight. But according to TCM, eating lighter, more natural foods gives the liver a chance to repair itself and that alone can help us feel more energetic and improve our clarity of thought. The immune system also functions better when excess sugar and dairy are removed.

Acupuncture is one of the tools in the TCM toolbox that can help make the transition from winter to spring easier. Acupuncture can balance the body as it reacts to the changes in the weather and activity levels. Regular acupuncture treatments have also been shown to boost immunity. Spring can cause flare ups associated with seasonal allergies and acupuncture treatments can help with the inflammation, sneezing, runny nose and watery eyes that accompany the allergic reactions. But most of all, acupuncture can help regulate those emotional imbalances that are often common during this transitional period.

Feng Shui is another way to make the transition from winter to spring easier. You might have heard of Feng Shui referred to in the Western world as similar to interior design. However, in Chinese culture, feng shui is understood as a far more complex system. It is a practice intended to create harmony in our interior space and relates to our personal energy, the natural world, and our environment.

The goal of feng shui is to create energized and balanced spaces by drawing in positive energies. It draws on a system of interactions and laws about how humans perceive our physical environment. The art of feng shui governs spatial arrangement and orientation in relation to the flow of energy or Qi (pronounced “chee”). Tossing out old clothing, magazines or just going through that one junk drawer we all have, will create an empty space that will then allow for growth throughout the spring season.
By incorporating some simple TCM techniques into your life you may just have a more enjoyable metamorphosis from winter into spring.

Ask me for more information about how acupuncture and TCM can help!


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